Monday, September 27, 2021

HOW HACKING CAN BE MITIGATED BY REBOOTING THE PHONE

 Hacking can be mitigated by rebooting the phone
HOW HACKING CAN BE MITIGATED BY REBOOTING THE PHONE
HOW HACKING CAN BE MITIGATED BY REBOOTING THE PHONE

When digital security is being talked about around the world, the oldest and easiest way to fix a computer is to turn the device off and on, which can thwart hackers' attempts to steal smartphone data.

Being a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Senator Angus King has good reason to be concerned about hackers. He said he had received some advice on keeping cellphones safe at a briefing by security officials this year.


Step 1: Turn off the phone


Step 2: Open the phone


Diameter! When it comes to digital security, the oldest and easiest way to fix a computer is to turn it off and on, which can thwart hackers' attempts to steal smartphone data.

Switching smartphones on and off regularly won't stop cybercriminals or hired intelligence firms from threatening to keep information secure and private in the digital world, but will make it harder for skilled hackers to break into someone else's phone and steal information. Will give

According to Neil Zaering, technical director of the National Security Agency's cybercrime department, "It's basically a way for those bad guys to increase the cost of their jobs."

The National Security Agency last year enacted a policy on mobile device security that recommended rebooting phones once a week as a way to prevent hacking.

King, an independent senator from Maine, said rebooting the phone has become part of his routine now, adding that "I'd say reboot maybe once a week, whenever I feel like it."

The phone is usually always in the hands of the people. The phone contains a lot of personal and sensitive data. And they become top targets of cell phone hackers. They trace his text messages, contacts and photos, location and even secretly turn on his video and microphone to steal user information.

"I consider the phone to be our digital soul," said Patrick Ward, a security expert and former National Security Agency researcher.

There's no exact count of how many people's phones are hacked each year, but data shows the number is significant.

The results of a recent International Media Union investigation into phone hacking have caused political upheaval in France, India, Hungary and elsewhere. The researchers found that a large number of journalists, human rights activists and politicians were on the potential list of an Israeli hacking company.

Zering says that usually when hackers get a chance to break into a device or network, they find a way to take over a computer's root file system with malicious software. But phone makers like Apple and Google are building operating systems with more robust security barriers to ward off these malware.


"It's hard for a hacker to break through that barrier and get into a phone," he said.

As a result, hackers are looking for other methods. They follow the sender by identifying the 'in-memory payload'. This type of hacking is circumvented by rebooting. But this is not the case in most cases, as people politely turn off their phones.

According to expert Wardle, "If they can somehow get into your device just once, read chat messages, access contacts and passwords, then the game is almost over, isn't it?"

Currently there is a strong market for phone hacking tools. Companies like Gerodium and Crowdfence are publicly offering millions of dollars for zero-click hacking tools.

Several hacker companies have been established in recent times to work with money, providing mobile device hacking tools to the government and law enforcement. The popular is the Israel NSO Group. Researchers say the phones of human rights activists, journalists and even Catholic priests around the world are being hacked with their spyware.

NSO Group's hacking tool Pegasus was recently reported in the media. The Washington Post reports that in 36 cases using Pegasus, the phones of businessmen, human rights activists and others have been successfully hacked or attempted.

Facebook has filed a lawsuit against the company in the US. That being said, they targeted WhatsApp's private messages on 1,400 Facebook customers through ZeroClick.

NSO Group says they sell their spyware only to tested government agencies intended to be used against terrorists or major criminals. However, the company did not respond to a request for comment.

NSO company spyware became popular for its effectiveness. Vice News says that a few years ago, that company's US-based partner gave law enforcement a hacking tool that works even after a phone factory reset.

MarkJack has been closely monitoring the activities of NSO Group for many years. According to him, the company first started with zero-click exploit which will run successfully till 2019.

People who were affected by this on WhatsApp would receive some incoming calls before the hacking tool entered their phones. In 2020, MarkJack and Citizen Lab Zero-Click caught another hacking attempt by the NSO group targeting several Al Jazeera journalists. Hackers use Apple's iMessage texting service.

"Those who were targeted didn't see anything on their phone screens," MarkJack said. It was completely invisible and users were not involved in any way." MarkJack said that they have such powerful hacking tools that even rebooting your phone won't work. When you reboot, it's a and will send zero-clicks.

"It's a slightly different model tool," he said. It acts like a recurring infection."

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